Sunday, February 11, 2018

How Can You Learn? Count the Ways!


In the last post, learning consultant Ivy Young shared the ways in which the California Association of Museums created a climate of learning for museum colleagues in the state.  Now, she shares some of her favorite tools developed by museum peer learning groups. Begin exploring! And many thanks, Ivy, for sharing the work of our California colleagues.

To whet your appetite for learning here are just a few of my favorite knowledge products, by topic:



Visualize accessibility interventions in a four-quadrant graph organized from least to greatest impact across one axis and easiest to most demanding implementation across the other axis. Participants in the San Francisco region mapped accessibility interventions for fellow museum professionals in an interactive Prezi that also includes topical resources and examples.


A Culture of Inclusion: Recommendations for Museum Accessibility Policy
The Gold Country region produced a six-page document outlining core criteria to consider in crafting museum accessibility policies: Feedback, Universal Design, Diversity Training, Inclusion, Inviting Atmosphere, Education, External Access, and Evaluation. Users may read the document in its entirety or jump to select criteria. References and resources are also embedded.


The Shasta Cascade region produced this simple, one-page, graphic roadmap to guide museum practitioners through critical process considerations in designing audience research studies.


2.5 Hour Evaluation Challenge
Central Coast regional participants created a template for any museum team interested in designing a pilot evaluation. Along with the evaluation study, this knowledge product provides an easy, step-by-step process for creating and implementing the pilot study and, later, reflecting on the instrument, it’s implementation, and assessing the collected data.



How do institutions change to become more inclusive and engaging? The Los Angeles region created an insightful infographic that documents a pathway for the organizational change process from the individual to the institution, and finally to the holistic relationship with the public they serve.


Identifying Engagement Tumblr 
Examples of visitor engagement can be found throughout the Inland Empire region. Program participants here created this Tumblr account to highlight the engagement strategies they recognized around them. What’s more, you too may submit your own examples of engagement to the Tumblr!

I am incredibly proud of the collaborative work that everyone involved brought to the CNfC pilot. I really could go on and on… However, I am going to leave you here with just a few more avenues for additional information should you be curious for more:

I’m eager to know what you think, too. What have your most collaborative experiences entailed? What made them tricky? What made them satisfying? Did they lead to any unanticipated outcomes? Let’s keep the conversation going in the comments below.

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, grant number MG-10-14-0010-14, and with the generous support of all CNfC partner organizations.

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